Accreditations

 

Badge pick up hours and location 

Pre-Festival 

The Commons, 401 Richmond Street West  

October 16 & 17 | 2:00pm - 7:00pm

During the Festival @ Guest services  

Native Canadian Centre of Toronto, 16 Spadina Road

October 18, Wednesday | 1:30pm - 4:00pm

Hot Docs Ted Rogers Cinema, 506 Bloor Street West

October 18, Wednesday | 5:30pm - 7:30pm

TIFF Bell Lightbox, 350 King Street West

October 19, Thursday | 10:00am - 10:00pm

October 20, Friday | 9:00am - 12:30am

October 21, Saturday | 9:00am - 9:00pm

October 22, Sunday | 10:00am - 9:30pm

 


Delegate Bag Art Work

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This year’s Festival delegate bags feature a beautiful original work created by Toronto based artists Chief Lady Bird (Potawatomi/Chippewa), and Monique Bedard aka Aura (Oneida). This delegate bag artwork commission is a collaboration collaboration between imagineNATIVE and Indigenous Fashion Week Toronto, and is made possible through Sponsorship by from Miziwe-Biik Aboriginal Employment & Training with additional support from Sourcing Central

Monique Bedard (Aura) is a Haudenosaunee (Oneida) artist who grew up in a small town in Southern Ontario. In 2006, she began a formal study of visual arts at Fanshawe College in London, ON. After three years of studies in London, she moved to Lethbridge, AB to complete an undergraduate degree at the University of Lethbridge. She received her Bachelor of Fine Arts (Studio Art) degree in 2010. Monique currently resides in Tkaronto as an artist, muralist and workshop facilitator. She is also a Diploma Toronto Art Therapy Candidate working on the completion of a major project titled “Our Stories Our Truths: an Art-Based Storytelling Project” with an emphasis on art as healing. 

Chief Lady Bird is an Anishinaabe (Potawatomi and Chippewa)artist from Rama First Nation, with paternal ties to Moose Deer Point First Nation. She grew up on reserve and is currently based in Toronto. Chief Lady Bird’s work exists at the crux of her experience as an Indigenous womyn wherein critiques of nationalism and Indigenous identity reclamation meet, resulting in imagery that empowers Indigenous peoples and challenges the lens through which Indigenous people are often viewed.  She often creates collaborative murals that allow viewers to step into our worldviews for brief moments to create dialogue that is imperative to reclaiming our cultural identities in a country that never saw our worth.